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Self-correction strategies are strategies that rely on the redundancy of language to detect print errors. If a reader monitors what is being said as a passage is read aloud (or self-monitors subvocalized speech during silent reading) reading errors can be perceived in the form of interruptions and dysfluencies. Use of self-correction enables a reader to maintain reading accuracy and infer the probable correct pronunciation of an element in the text from context. The hypothesized development of these skills is presented in Development Table 45.

Progress in self-correction skills is an indirect measure of progress in the Common Core Standards for Reading Foundational Standard 4 and Language Standard 2.

Literature Note - Self-Correction


Development Table 45. Hypothesized Development of Self-Correction Skills

Level
Interpretation
Deliberation
Expression
Preliminary
(oral to word)
Recognizes failures in decoding (which may be due to misspelled words) in a reviewed text.
Triggers metacognitive reasoning about spelling, using sound-out, look-up, analogical or prescriptive strategies to repair the loss of comprehension.
While writing, recognizes failures to determine the conventional spelling of a word
Foundational
(word to sentence)
Recognizes unexpected patterns of capitalization or punctuation in a reviewed text.
Triggers metacognitive reasoning about capitalization and punctuation, using sound-out and prescriptive strategies to repair the loss of comprehension.
While writing, recognizes failures to follow basic capitalization or basic punctuation practices (or shows uncertainty about whether one has succeeded in following them).
Basic
(sentence to text)
Recognizes chunks of punctuated text that do not parse as punctuated in a reviewed text.
Triggers metacognitive reasoning about the interpretation of a sentence, applying alternate punctuations to find the correct intonation pattern.
While writing, recognizes failures to follow conventional sentence punctuation patterns (or shows uncertainty about whether one has succeeded in following them).
Intermediate
(text to context)
Recognizes prescriptive grammar errors that can affect basic interpretation of a reviewed text.
Triggers metacognitive reasoning to clarify intended reference and emphasis.
While writing, recognizes that one has failed to follow conventional grammatical patterns (or is uncertain about whether they have been followed).
Advanced
(text and context to discourse)
Recognizes deviations from a stylesheet in a reviewed text.
Triggers metacognitive reasoning to determine how to bring surface form into line with stylesheet requirements.
Recognizes that one has failed to follow a specified stylesheet (or is uncertain about whether that stylesheet has been followed).




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